Category Archives: Dressings and condiments

Shallot Marmalade


Today in Jeff’s Quarantine Kitchen, shallot jamwe’re cooking up an experiment…shallot marmalade. I’ve been working on different takes on marmalade for about three years now, starting when Ellen showed me a Pinterest post about Meyer Lemon marmalade; now I’m growing my own Meyer lemons. I’ve made marmalade from these lemons, Key limes, Valencia and navel oranges, blood oranges, clementines, red grapefruits, both red and Vidalia onions—have I missed anything?

I found this recipe in search of a better recipe for orange marmalade. My search took me to the web site of the Paris- and New York-based chef David Leibovitz. He has a whole section of his blog (www.davidliebovitz.com) dedicated to jams and jellies, and a lot of the recipes are just rockin’. If you’re in the hunt for good alternative takes on homemade condiments I recommend this site highly.

So…shallot marmalade: what is it good for? Try it as a condiment on burgers, grilled chicken or salmon, spread a dollop over a wedge of Brie or Camembert (wrap the whole cheese in foil and bake in a 325-degree oven for 15 minutes, unwrap and add the marmalade), or simply spooned onto a toasted baguette slice. The fact is, shallots have a wonderful flavor, and with quality ingredients, the result ought to be spectacular. We’ll see.

So what’s the roadmap for this new and interesting new product? Here it is, altered slightly (as I am wont to do) from David Liebovitz’s original recipe. The fragrance is amazing. The flavor is, too.

Almost David Liebovitz’s Shallot Marmalade

Ingredients:

1 lb. shallots, peeled and thinly sliced

2 tablespoon unflavored vegetable oil

big pinch of coarse salt

a few turns of freshly-cracked black pepper

1/2 cup Belgian White beer

1/4 cup sugar

2 tablespoons honey

3 tablespoons apple cider or balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup raisins, dried currants, or cranberries

Preparation:

1. In a medium-sized saucepan, warm the oil and saute the shallots over moderate heat with a pinch of salt and pepper, stirring frequently, until the shallots are soft and wilted, which should take about 10 minutes.

2. Add the beer, sugar, honey, vinegar, and dried cranberries (or raisins or currants), and continue cooking, stirring frequently, until the shallots begin to caramelize. While cooking, continue stirring them just enough to keep them from burning. If the mixture seems to be very dry, add a small splash of water toward the end of cooking, to encourage a little juiciness.

3. The jam is done when the shallots are nicely-caramelized to a deep, dark brown. Do not overcook; there should still be a bit of juices in the pot when it’s ready. Transfer to a jar.

Storaage: You can keep the marmalade in the refrigerator for about two months.

Epicure Market Vinaigrette Salad Dressing

epicure tile

It’s as easy as it gets, and even better to put on a salad.

It’s the vinaigrette salad dressing that changed the salad-eating habits of Miami Beach folk forever. Before this small beauty came along, salad dressing meant Wishbone or Milano French dressing. Out in Vegas they were creating Caesar dressing, but in South Florida this was the magic, and it was oh, so simple. You can keep the memory alive with this simple dressing, just the way we made it.

Ingredients:

6 ounces first cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil

2 ounces red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon agave sugar (granulated will do in a pinch)

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 garlic clove, smashed but not chopped

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 teaspoon dried marjoram

Preparation:

Make the dressing 24 hours in advance.

Place all the ingredients except the olive oil and the garlic clove in a stainless steel or other non-reactive bowl and mix well.  Pour into a glass jar, add the garlic clove, cover and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Immediately before serving, remove the garlic clove, pour the dressing back into the sam bowl, beat rapidly with a wire whisk, and slowly drizzle the olive oil into the bowl to incorporate the ingredients.  Add the garlic clove back into the dressing, pour into a serving vessel like a gravy boat, and serve immediately.

The dressing can be made ahead with the olive oil incorporated, but you will need to bring it to room temperature and whip rapidly before serving.

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