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Pan-Seared Scallops and Risotto with Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegar Pan Sauce

Red wine and scallops? Heresy!

Or not.

This one deserves a try, because A) it’s so damn simple; and B) because at the beach house it’s all I had on hand. What surprised me was just how quick and simple it was to make.

Confession: we didn’t really make risotto–that’s way too fussy for beach cooking–rather in this case it was brown rice cooked a bit too long, then steeped off the stove for a while until it got mushy and gluey. But the pan sauce loosened it up a bit. At home I’d make a real Parmesan risotto with some shredded zucchini and fresh tomatoes (https://jeffskitchen.net/2012/08/06/zucchini-parmesan-risotto/).

But the scallops are fresh and local here in Chincoteague, and the dish was perfect.

Here’s the plan:

Ingredients:

1 pound fresh sea scallops (about 18)

2 teaspoons Meyer lemon-infused olive oil (available at most good gourmet shops)

1/2 cup red wine

2 tablespoons premium Balsamic vinegar

Old Bay seasoning

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Fresh chives or green onion

Preparation:

1. Rinse well and pat dry the scallops–make sure they’re VERY DRY. Season with salt, pepper, and a very light dusting of Old Bay seasoning.

2. Heat the pan over medium-high heat, then add half the olive oil and count to ten. Gently place half the scallops in the pan and sear three minutes without moving them; flip and sear the other side for two additional minutes. Remove to a plate and keep them in a warm oven. Repeat with the remaining olive oil and scallops.

3. Turn the heat under the pan down to medium and add the wine and vinegar, stirring constantly to deglaze the pan. Make sure to scrape up all the brown bits in the pan into the liquid–that’s where the magic happens. Reduce the pan sauce by half.

Serve the scallops over the rice or risotto and drizzle with the pan sauce. Garnish with chopped chives.

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Chinese-Style Scallops At the Beach — Lancaster Online

By JEFF THAL, Talking Fresh

 We’ve been driving all day to the beach in Virginia. It’s hot down here — 100 degrees some places on the mainland, and a relatively cool 92 degrees out at the beach. It’s too hot to spend a lot of time slaving over a hot stove, and besides, kids are chomping for some beachy takeout.

Because most of the takeout here consists of deep-fried seafoods, I figure we need to find another alternative on our first day at the beach.

“Chinese!” says one. “Yeah,” hollers the other. “Chinese!”

“At the beach?” I ask. “Really?”

I’m sort of relieved to discover that there is only one Chinese takeout place in this quiet little beach village, and we’ve learned that it isn’t particularly good.

But wait! I have another idea: How about if I whip up something yummy out of what we find here in town?

The idea is met with some skepticism.

Undaunted, I head out to the seafood market down the street from our little rental cottage to see what I can find, and what luck! Big, beautiful sea scallops, the size of ping-pong balls, which were brought in on a boat that day. Both kids really like scallops, which we often broil or sauté with browned butter, lemon juice and garlic.

But the kids wanted Chinese, so I think I’ll give them what they want. I pick up a couple of Asian ingredients from the local market, a piece of fresh ginger and some scallions and voila! It’s a tasty, sweet and spicy Chinese takeout dish, General Tso’s scallops, made with fresh, locally caught sea scallops and some locally grown broccoli.

Sea scallops are a tasty, different kind of seafood, and if you haven’t tried them, I highly recommend you do so. Mr. Bill’s Fresh Seafood on Harrisburg Pike carries some of the nicest, freshest sea scallops around, and the proprietor, Tim Glatfelter, or a member of the staff there will gladly provide you with some terrific tips and advice on cooking them in various delicious ways.

You can also make this dish with shrimp, chicken or beef, but you need to try it.

GENERAL TSO’S SCALLOPS

1 pound sea scallops, washed, drained and dried

1/2 cup rice wine, separated into two 1/4-cup measures

4 teaspoons oyster sauce

4 teaspoons cornstarch

1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar

2 teaspoons granulated sugar

1 teaspoon Chinese chili-garlic sauce

4 teaspoons peanut oil

1 tablespoon peeled fresh ginger, finely grated

2 scallions, chopped

2 cups broccoli florets, cut into bite-sized pieces

Combine scallops, 2 tablespoons rice wine, 2 teaspoons oyster sauce and 3 teaspoons cornstarch in a medium mixing bowl; toss to coat. Combine vinegar, sugar, chili-garlic sauce and remaining rice wine from the first 1/4-cup measure, oyster sauce and cornstarch in a separate bowl.

Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a wok or large nonstick skillet over medium heat until smoking. Add half of the scallops and cook until browned, about 2 minutes per side; transfer to a warm plate. Add 1 teaspoon of oil to the skillet and repeat with remaining scallops.

Wipe the skillet with paper towels and return to heat. Add remaining oil and the ginger and scallions and stir-fry until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the second 1/4 cup of wine and the broccoli florets to the skillet; reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 3 minutes. Add the cooked scallops and the ingredients from the second bowl back to the skillet and stir-fry, cooking and stirring constantly until the sauce thickens and the scallops are cooked through, about 2 minutes.

Serve immediately beside a 1/2 cup of white steamed rice.

And if you want to spice it up a bit, add two or three Asian dried red chilies just before you add the ginger and the scallions, and stir-fry them until they turn black, then proceed as directed.

Email Jeff Thal at talking.fresh@yahoo.com or visit his blog, talkingfresh.typepad.com/blog.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/683610_Chinese-style-scallops-at-the-beach.html#ixzz234GyTEB7

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